The Old Charges Revisited

Reading Time: 24 minutes Since 1717, this has been a subject of passionate concern to almost every Freemason. There remain a mass of competing views and theories, and this question has dominated research into Freemasonry.

Historical Origins of the Mark Degree

Reading Time: 11 minutes The Mark is a ceremony or degree [sometimes called the ‘friendly’ degree], conferrable today only to Master Masons and forms part of a hierarchical organization. In Craft Masonry it was quite a late innovation making its appearance during the mid-1700s.  However we do know that Operative Masons, without any kind of ceremony, were taking marks 150 years before the Mark came into use as part of that particular ceremony.

The Influence of Kings on Craft Freemasonry

Reading Time: 27 minutes ‘From time immemorial’ we have been very fortunate in that our Craft has had the support of Royalty. Without that support I doubt that we would be in the same position as we are today, even taking into account our declining numbers. Royalty brought and registered a degree of class, charisma & gentlemanly behaviour to … Read more

THE ROOTS OF FREEMASONRY – W.Bro. Trevor Jenkins, PM Nautilus Lodge No. 4259

Reading Time: 19 minutes For centuries Masonic historians have been puzzled by the motives for, and the purpose of, the formation of the craft of freemasonry, both in its operative, and speculative form, and whilst endeavouring to investigate the mysteries surrounding the formation of our order, it seems that the riddle actually forms itself into three distinct questions

FREEMASONRY IN THE EARLY 1600 AND 1700

Reading Time: 16 minutes There is such an abundance of evidence in proof of the continuity of Freemasonry during the period selected, that it is only necessary to study the special records of the old Lodges, happily still preserved, the Rolls of the “Old Charges”, and especially the extant minutes of the Masons’ Company of London, to be assured that the Freemasons of the present day are the lineal descendants of the operative builders, who in the 17th century, and earlier, admitted speculative or non-professional members.