Freemasons donations to Prostate Cancer Scotland top £400,000

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Scottish Freemasons donations to Prostate Cancer Scotland top £400,000

It was announced at the Installation of the Grand Master Mason that Scottish Freemasons have donated £400,000 to Prostate Cancer Scotland.

This includes raising  £100k in one day when in Glasgow on 14 May 2016, twenty-eight freemasons carried out a zip slide across the River Clyde. The event was very well supported by over 170 freemasons, friends and ladies and a large and enthusiastic crowd of supporters created a festival atmosphere.

In the UK, about 1 in 8 men will get prostate cancer at some point in their lives. Men aged 50 or over and men with a family history of prostate cancer are more at risk of getting prostate cancer.

Prostate disease and prostate cancer are diseases that are not often talked about and the symptoms are not very well known, although this is slowly improving. If you don’t know what the symptoms are or even where the prostate is located then you’re certainly not alone. In a recent survey in the UK over 50% of men over 55 years surveyed for Olympus Medical didn’t know the symptoms of prostate disease and where the prostate is located.

Only men have a prostate.  When born, the prostate starts out about the size of a pea then slowly grows to the size of a walnut, until the man is in his twenties.  Around the age of forty, the prostate starts to grow or enlarge again and this may cause problems for the man when passing urine.

Across the UK

  • Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men.
  • Over 47,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year – that’s 129 men every day.
  • Every 45 minutes one man dies from prostate cancer – that’s more than 11,000 men every year.
  • 1 in 8 men will get prostate cancer in their lifetime.
  • Over 330,000 men are living with and after prostate cancer.

In Scotland

  • More than 3,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year in Scotland.
  • More than 900 men die from prostate cancer every year in Scotland.

In England

  • Almost 40,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year in England.
  • More than 10,000 men die from prostate cancer every year in England.
  • Every 45 minutes one man dies from prostate cancer in England.

In Wales

  • More than 2,500 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year in Wales.
  • More than 500 men die every year from prostate cancer in Wales.

In Northern Ireland

  • More than 1,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year in Northern Ireland.
  • More than 200 men die every year from prostate cancer in Northern Ireland.

If prostate cancer is diagnosed at an early stage, the chances of survival are generally good. About 90% of men diagnosed at stages 1 or 2 will live at least five more years and 65-90% will live for at least 10 more years.

If you are diagnosed with stage 3 prostate cancer, you have a 70-80% of chance of living for at least five more years.

However, if you are diagnosed when your prostate cancer has reached stage 4, there is only a 30% chance you will live for at least five more years.

This is why early detection is so important, and men are encouraged to go for testing.

Find out More by Visiting https://www.prostatescotland.org.uk